In praise of library ebooks

ebook image KWLNow that I no longer work at the library, I think I appreciate it even more. (Be nice to the librarians, people! Especially during season!) I especially appreciate the ebook collection — especially now that I no longer have to coach people through using it when the people who need the coaching inevitably don’t know their Amazon password, or insist they don’t have one, even though they own a Kindle. Or are understandably frustrated and confused at having to register with Adobe AGAIN to download an epub book. Or have some hand-me-down five-year-old off-brand e-reader …

But seriously, it’s getting easier! And once you get it down, it’s almost as easy as buying an ebook from Amazon or Apple, only without that part where your credit card gets charged. And it has the great benefit common to ebooks — instant gratification (as long as no one else has requested that title). I am currently #23 on a wait list for one of the library’s two ebook copies of The Girl On The Train. I’m #56 for one of the five print copies. Which will show up first?

But I digress. The point of this post is that I recently learned of two works of historical fiction, I suggested them to the library as ebook purchases and wham, there they were within a couple days. And besides appreciating the excellent responsiveness of my particular library (which I know from talking to other patrons is not just to me), this is to say that wherever you are, the chances are pretty good that your library welcomes your suggestions — that way they know that somebody wants the book. So check your library website, or ask next time you’re there. And if they don’t have or can’t get what you’re looking for, just browse around. Ebook collections are growing astonishingly fast so if it’s been a couple months, you might be surprised at what — and how much — you’ll find.

The books, by the way, were The Siege Winter by Ariana Franklin and Samantha Norman, and The Tapestry by Nancy Bilyeau. Ariana Franklin was the author of the excellent Mistress of the Art of Death series, set during the reign of Henry II. Franklin, whose real name was Diana Norman, died in 2011. I was upset to hear that both because I really liked that series so I was saddened to hear of her passing — and because the last volume left things in a kind of precarious place. So selfishly, I was glad to see that her final book was taken up by her daughter, Samantha Norman — and even more delighted when I read on Goodreads that the daughter intends to take up the Mistress of the Art of Death series. The Siege Winter is not part of that series — it’s set earlier, during the civil war between the Empress Matilda, Henry II’s mother, and her cousin Stephen. But it’s a really good book that stands on its own. It’s not as much of a historical crime or mystery book as the others, but a piece of historical fiction. And it was nicely done. I’m only about halfway through The Tapestry and unfortunately am liking it less, even though it’s set in the Tudor court. Joanna is just a difficult heroine to inhabit sometimes, and some of her feelings and actions and motivations don’t seem to make sense. But I like it enough to stick with it to the end and recommend it for others who are hooked on the Tudor era for historical crime (C.J. Sansom, S.J. Parris, P.F. Chisholm, etc.). Hell, if nothing else, Bilyeau should get extra points for using her full first name and not initials, right?

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Filed under book reviews, ebooks, Key West Library, libraries, recommended reading

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